Searching for locations: A typical diner, New York

We decided to have lunch in a traditional Diner.

On an early morning walk, I discovered the Brooklyn Diner, a small restaurant tucked away in a street not far from Columbus Circle, perhaps a piece of history from the American past.

After all, if you’re going to take in the sights, sounds, and food of a country what better way to do it than visiting what was once a tradition.

This one was called the Brooklyn Diner.  It had a combination of booths and counter sit down, though the latter was not a very big space, so we opted for a booth.

The object of going to a Diner is the fact they serve traditional American food, which when you get past the hot dogs and hamburgers and fries, takes the form of turkey and chicken pot pies among a variety of other choices.

Still looking for a perfectly cooked turkey, something I’ve never been able to do myself, I opted for the Teadition Turkey Lunch, which the menu invitingly said was cooked especially at the diner and was succulent.  I couldn’t wait.

We also ordered a hamburger, yes, yet another, and a chicken pot pie, on the basis the last one I had in Toronto was absolutely delicious (and cooked the same way since the mid-1930s)

While waiting we got to look at a slice of history belonging to another great American tradition, Baseball, a painting on the wall of the Brooklyn Dodgers at Ebbets field, long since gone from their home.

The Turnkey lunch looked like this

which didn’t seem to be much, and had this odd pasta slice on the plate, but the turkey was amazing and lived up to the menu description.

The Chicken Pot Pie looked like this

And looked a lot larger in reality than the photo shows.

But, sadly while it was not bad, it was a little dry, and could possibly do with using the more succulent thigh part of the chicken.

All of this was washed down by Long Island Ice Teas and Brooklyn Lager.

AS for the Diner experience, it’s definitely a 10 out of 10 for me.

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Local history recorded on plaques

Walking round towns and villages in England it is possible to spot signs and plaques erected by various organisations with an interest in local history.

Sometimes they are too high or too weathered to be easily read. A photo may be enlarged to help decipher the writing on the wall.

My photos are all from Cumbria and taken using my phone.

Ludhiana Christian Medical college. (SHIELD AT TOP OF PLAQUE)
DAME EDITH MARY BROWN
DBE (1931). KAISAR-I-HIND (Gold 1922)
MA (Cantab). MD (Brux). FRCSEd. MRCOG.
BORN HERE 24 MARCH 1864
DIED 6 DECEMBER 1956 IN SRINAGAR, INDIA.
EDUCATED AT GIRTON COLLEGE, CAMBRIDGE.
THE LONDON SCHOOL OF MEDICINEN FOR WOMEN AND 
tHE ROYAL FREE HOSPITAL. SAILED TO INDIA WITH
THE BAPTIST ZENANA MISSION IN 1891.
FOUNDER PRINCIPAL OF TEH WOMEN'S CHRISTIAN MEDICAL
COLLEGE, LUDHIANA 1894-1942. PIONEER EDUCATOR.
REFORMER, ADMINISTRATOR AND SURGEON.
SHE SAW THE COLLEGE BECOME CO-EDUCATIONAL,
AFFILIATED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF THE PUNJAB,
AND WIDELY RCOGNISED
Plaque commemorating Dame Mary Edith Brown
Plaque commemorating 'Romany'
‘Romany’ of the BBC – The Reverend G. Bramwell Evens

The plaque commemorating the popular children’s broadcaster known as Romany was unveiled by Terry Waite, CBE.

Weathered plaque with text and a picture of a family crest with an illegible ribbon
A weathered plaque (text below)

GALE MANSION
Built by William Gale
In the 1730s as merchant
traders the family had strong links
with the Virginian tobacco trade.
William Gale was the brother-in law of
Mildred Washington, the grandmother of
George Washington, 1st President of the USA.

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Haarlem Girls Weekend

At Easter, Flora and I had a girls weekend trip to Haarlem. It was so beautiful and so much fun to spend quality time with this girl. She is the easiest, happy traveler. I really love her so much, it’s hard to put into words.

We finally visited the Corrie ten Boom huis. I think this was more fun for myself, but weeks later when we were reading about her with Thibault in the Rebel Girls’ Book, I could see that she was really proud that she had been there and knew who this person was.

Haarlem was beautiful. Tulips blooming, sun was shining, and lunch outdoors. We had dinner one night at a sushi restaurant. Flora was so cute and happy. She thought the place was so modern. These are little things that make kids excited about life and me too. But, the highlight was the kermis. Flora loves a kermis! She’s a kid who cannot get enough of this stuff. She was so happy that we could go on the rides and see Haarlem from high up.

It was a beautiful weekend. I love that this tradition is returning. It really was a spectacular weekend together.

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